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CASE STUDY: TEDDER HALL

By: Oladipo Kayode A.

Since the historical increase in the accommodation fees from an initial fourteen thousand naira per session to thirty thousand naira per session, things in the Hall of Fame; Tedder Hall have been pretty much the same – nothing particularly significant has improved over the years, at least not on independent account of the school or hall management, as the recently constructed gym was an initiative of the Hall Executives.

LAUDABLE ACTIONS

There have been some encouraging things, however few, which have been put in place in the Hall of Fame.

  • After the heavy rainfall of April 6th, 2018, the roofs covering C Block have since been replaced.
  • Fluorescent lamps have been installed and replaced as the case may be in each room.
  • Needed electrical fittings have been installed and replaced.

UNSWIMMABLE POOL AND DAMAGED SOAKAWAY IN FRONT OF THE HALL

Despite the saddening fact that the cold hands of death have thrice gripped precious souls of beloved students, there continues to exist a breeding ground for the uninformed perpetrators of these dastardly acts – mosquitoes.

A large unpleasantly green pool of stagnant water lies in all its glory right at the front of the hall spotting trillions of seen and unseen organisms, soon to be home to dozens of blood sucking mosquitoes. As at the time of writing this report, nothing is yet to be done to get rid of this pool.

In much more unpleasantness, the soakaway in front of the hall lies damaged for a prolonged period of time announcing one’s arrival to the Hall of Fame by the odour which it exudes.

 

THE LOCKS WHICH CAN OPENED BY MANY KEYS

Most faulty locks have been replaced by the Hall Management, which is a laudable action on their path. However, practically all the locks are manufactured by one company and there is an uncanny similitude between the keys. This development which although has its pros in manifestation when a resident misplaces his room key, is a loophole for thieves and men of the underworld which many times have been exploited. Many cases of theft recorded in the hall have been on account of these universally unlockable locks.

THE DISTANT KITCHENETTES

Although the University regulations state that, “all cooking is to be done in the kitchenette”, and although there is a lot of cooking going on in the Hall of Fame, the designated areas of cooking seem to have been largely abandoned by a bulk of the residents of the hall – one of the kitchenettes have even become a store for sacks of empty plastic bottles.

When quizzed about this development, some students (name withheld) complained about the distance of the kitchenettes from their rooms which increases the stress of transporting food materials and cooking utensils from their rooms to the kitchenettes; there is only one kitchenette serving an entire floor and hence students prefer, however unlawful, to go the other commonly known of route of cooking.

CONCERNING THE MULTICOLORED WHITE HOUSES

Perhaps common to all University owned halls of residence is the deplorable state in which the toilet and bathroom facilities are in, and although the employed cleaners try their possible best every working day to make these facilities fit for human use, their state at the end of the day seems to have been preprogrammed to be bad.

On approaching any of these facilities, one’s nose is soon greeted with a pungent stench of urine and one develops cold feet; literally, without the aid of footwear as the facilities are almost always flooded – while this fault may be attributed to the students, the needed equipment with which the students can easily keep the white house clean are absent.

For instance, none of the toilets in the hall have water constantly running in them; and while answering nature’s calls, students often have to squat on the seats or coat them with layers of tissue in order to move their bowels because of the state in which the seats find themselves:

  • Some toilet seats lack lids
  • Some have sempiternal stains on them.
  • Some toilet seats are not flushable

The ‘bathrooms’ are not in any better condition in comparison with the toilets. A typical bathroom in the hall is almost always flooded with unwanted water and lacks, quite sadly, a front door.

Hence, students have to erect make-do coverings with their towels or other means of improvisation.

The urinary facilities are also in deplorable states as they have a seemingly irremovable stench. The facilities, unlike modern ones, do not have some form of absorbent like camphor to reduce the intensity of the stench of the urine.

The tainted white houses on display

RECOMMENDATIONS TO SCHOOL MANAGEMENT ON THE IMPROVEMENT OF THE STANDARD OF LIVING OF RESIDENTS

As is visible to the blind and audible to the deaf, the state of things summarily in the Hall particularly as regards the safety of health is quite alarming. With the high risk of various easily communicable infections spread amongst residents and almost no precautions taken to prevent such, an epidemic, if it occurs, could be near unmanageable by the school and hall management.

In view of this, the following should be done as regards the toilet facilities and the pool in front of the hall:

  • Disinfectants should be provided at all times in close vicinity of the toilet facilities.
  • Clogging of the floors should be rectified by fixing the existing or totally replacing the drainage in the toilets to prevent flooding.
  • Toilet seats should be totally replaced as their apparent age do not favour repairs.
  • Water should be made available at all times; in the toilets and also from tap fittings which also should be installed in all toilet facilities to add proper maintenance by the users.
  • Very importantly, the pool of stagnant water present in front of the hall should be removed as quickly as possible and the possibility of the recurrence of another should be totally eliminated.

As regards the unused kitchenettes and locks, the following should be done:

  • Mini kitchenettes could be fashioned in balconies of rooms in order to fix the distance problem experienced by occupants of distant rooms.
  • Water should be made available at all times to aid cooking and also proper maintenance of the kitchenettes.
  • Locks purchased should be more diverse to forestall possibly theft aided by the porosity of the existing locks.

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